The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online
The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online__front
The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online__below
The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online__right
The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online_top
The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online__after

Description

Product Description

Drawing on years of research, a renowned archaeologist traces the evolution of counting. She shows how the concept of numbers came about, how various societies answered the question "How many?," and how our modern-day decimal system was developed. Engrossing and enlightening, this fascinating book introduces children to one of our most important inventions.

00-01 Utah Book Award (Informational Books)

Notable Children''s Trade Books in the Field of Social Studies 2000, National Council for SS & Child. Book Council

From School Library Journal

Grade 3-5-One strength of this title is the cultural context into which the information has been placed so that children will understand not only how numbering and counting have evolved over time but also why. Some of the phrasing and several of the cultural examples are sophisticated but for the most part the information has been well adapted to a young audience. The book begins with a brief introduction that defines counting and numbers and then moves on to a historical overview. Hays''s attractive paintings, done in acrylic on linen, successfully interpret the concepts explained in the text. It would be a shame if older children dismissed this book because of its picture-book format, since they are unlikely to encounter a better explanation of the subject. There are some fine older, out-of-print books that convey much of the same information, but nothing in recent memory explains the topic quite so well.
Linda Greengrass, Bank Street College Library, New York City
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Scientific American

When we count, we say "one, two, three ... " but it is possible to count without using numbers at all. Perhaps instead we could just point to different parts of our body to represent varying amounts. Pointing to our left shoulder would mean nine, while pointing to our right eye would mean 15. This type of body counting is how the Paiela, the people of the highlands of Papua New Guinea, count. They have no special words for numbers. Another people, the Veddas of Sri Lanka, also count without numbers. They pile up pebbles to represent the objects: one pebble for each object. They have a few special counting words meaning things such as "a single," "a couple," "another one" and "many." In this book, author Schmandt-Besserat draws from her background as an archaeologist and takes us through the early counting techniques of the ancient Middle East to witness the evolution of our modern-day method. Try your hand at counting the way the ancient Sumerians did and experience a world without zero. Try to count like the ancient Greeks and learn the 27 letters of their alphabet that they used as numerals. After short experiments with these techniques, the advantages of the modern system become clear. You''ll never look at numbers in quite the same way again.

From Booklist

As the title succinctly states, this well-designed, large-format book traces the history of counting. Beginning with a look at primitive expressions of numbers, the text goes on to explain abstract counting and the methods used by the Sumerians, the Phoenicians, the Greeks, the Romans, and finally the Arabs, who brought Hindu numerals from India to Europe about 1,000 years ago. Finally, this demonstrates four clear advantages of the Arabic system, which is used throughout the modern world. The book surveys a broad subject and communicates it in a way that is comprehensible to young people yet never condescending to them. The large-scale illustrations portray people from many cultures, all with their own dignity and individual style. Imaginatively conceived and well composed, Hays'' acrylic paintings feature warm, harmonious colors and delicate plays of light and shadow against textured-linen backings. Cogently written and beautifully made, this handsome book spotlights a part of our heritage so basic that we take it for granted. Mathematical terms appended. Carolyn Phelan

From Kirkus Reviews

PLB 0-688-14119-6 A well-researched, intriguing account of how counting has evolved. Schmandt-Besserat recounts how the Paiela, who cultivate orchards in the highlands of Papua New Guinea, ``count by pointing to parts of their body. . . . The number 1 is called `left little finger,'' 11 is `left neck,'' 16 is `right ear,'' etc.'''' The Veddas of Sri Lanka ``count without numbers,'''' collecting pebbles to indicate ``how many.'''' She also painstakingly charts the long evolution of counting through abstract counting, the use of ten digits, and the advantages of Arabic numerals over the older systems. Her rigorous, scientific approach to the subject ensures that readers will never take the counting system for granted again. The full-color illustrations make history beautifully visual, while a glossary sets forth concrete definitions for readers to peruse. (index) (Nonfiction. 8+) -- Copyright ©1999, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved.

Review

"Denise Schmandt-Besserat, a world-famous archaeologist at the University of Texas, is generally credited as being the person who, through her discovery of physical number systems (clay tokens) from Sumerian civilization, first put together our current understanding of the origins of modern number systems...Numbers, and the way we represent them, are so much a part of our lives that you have to step back to realize that, like language itself, they are a truly remarkable invention. Such ''stepping back'' and reflecting is rarely done outside the college philosophy class. Despite its brevity - just 41 pages of text - ''The History of Counting'' provides a fairly comprehensive coverage of the whole field of number systems in general and the Hindu-Arabic system in particular."The New York Times Book Review 3/12/2000

About the Author

Michael Hays is the illustrator of several books for children, including Abiyoyo by Pete Seeger and Hello, Tree! by Joanne Ryder. He lives in Oak Park, IL.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
59 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Laura Brown
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Excellent Eye-Opener About Numbers!
Reviewed in the United States on September 27, 2019
I have used this book "left ring finger (number)" (also known as 2) times to begin working with small groups of students who are math-hesitant, if not fully math-phobic. It does a wonderful job of knocking down the idea that the numbers we have are eternal, and have never... See more
I have used this book "left ring finger (number)" (also known as 2) times to begin working with small groups of students who are math-hesitant, if not fully math-phobic. It does a wonderful job of knocking down the idea that the numbers we have are eternal, and have never been any different. The students are always rocked mentally to discover that people had to invent ideas about numbers, and that thinking differently than others doesn''t mean they are stupid.

I pair this with activities using Ancient Greek and Mayan numbers to further unsettle their pervasive beliefs about what numbers are, and what they can do. After a few rounds of "try to add these Greek numbers that have different symbols for 6 tens vs 6 ones in 66, or figuring out how Mayans multiplied, and how that is similar to, and different from the base 10 system generally leaves students grateful to use base 10 again, but with the idea that they can think things through, and make sense out of the system.

Forget about depending on the library system to have a copy of this -- having my own copy became necessary! A very worthwhile book!
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Magareeshi
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
We are using this as part of our Montessori "Story of Numbers" Great Lesson this year in our homeschool
Reviewed in the United States on September 19, 2017
What a lovely, clear and fascinating book. Age appropriate for lower elementary kids, but interesting for anyone. We are using this as part of our Montessori "Story of Numbers" Great Lesson this year in our homeschool. We really like this book a lot!
7 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Julie Brennan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful and comprehensive elem intro to math history
Reviewed in the United States on August 9, 2004
One of the biggest challenges I have had is finding in print books that are as good as some of the stand-by OOP books recommended on the best math reading lists. For example, Lancelot Hogben''s The Wonderful World of Mathematics is highly recommended, but oop and also... See more
One of the biggest challenges I have had is finding in print books that are as good as some of the stand-by OOP books recommended on the best math reading lists. For example, Lancelot Hogben''s The Wonderful World of Mathematics is highly recommended, but oop and also somewhat out of date.

I got this book today and am delighted, I''ll be using it for my classes this fall. It is almost a picture book, but dense - enough that I had to re-read parts of it to understand myself. Very highly illustrated so you can *see* what they are talking about, 41 pages, and the history covered is world wide, not just devoted to the Egyptians and Greeks. It is truly a comprehensive and universal history of counting brought down to kid level comprehension.

The print is good sized and spaced well to make it more readable. I''d say it is read alone level for 3rd through 6th. With my own 6 year old I can paraphrase the text and use the great visuals to get the ideas across. There is one page that has a wonderful visual of "body counting" and the wide-spread use of these techniques all over the world actually makes this a good living geography book as well.

For a parent that is very visual, you might like it yourself :o). The artwork isn''t juvenile, it''s clean and simple, I was very impressed with the book.
32 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
T. Hartwig
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This was a fun trip through the history of counting
Reviewed in the United States on January 5, 2017
This was a fun trip through the history of counting, introduces some important concepts for numeracy. Short with nice pictures, should be good for elementary school kids.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Nancy Sager
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Well written. Exceeded my expectations and will be part ...
Reviewed in the United States on July 9, 2014
Well written. Exceeded my expectations and will be part of my collection when I teach history to 2nd and 3rd graders in conjunction with the usefulness of numbers. The children were quite interested in the various ways of counting.
3 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Amazon Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can teach multiple topics.
Reviewed in the United States on February 27, 2020
Very informative. I feel I will able to pull a lot from the book and create other lessons.
Helpful
Report
Ann R. Gavey
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on December 4, 2015
very good for Math great lesson
Helpful
Report
Lena Green
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Five Stars
Reviewed in the United States on September 24, 2017
This book was very informative.
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

J.A.. Gale
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Four Stars
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 31, 2017
very god
very god
Report
Translate all reviews to English
Robert Weiss
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nicht zu empfehlen
Reviewed in Germany on November 14, 2016
Ein Kinderbuch zu einem unsinnig hohen Pries, lausige Beschreibung im Netz. 43 Seiten davon 18 mit verwertbaren Informationen. Nicht zu empfehlen.
Ein Kinderbuch zu einem unsinnig hohen Pries, lausige Beschreibung im Netz. 43 Seiten davon 18 mit verwertbaren Informationen. Nicht zu empfehlen.
Report
Translate review to English
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Pages with related products.

  • history. of mathematics
  • mathematics history
  • number system

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online

The outlet sale online sale History of Counting online