Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

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Description

• 20th Anniversary reisue of the 1996 psychedelic-pop masterpiece. • Contains the singles “Apiary” and “Doot-Doot.” • 10 bonus tracks—6 previously unissed. • Packaging features rare photos, ephemera, and a new essay. If you’ve seen Paul McCartney over the past nine years, you’ve seen Chris Holmes. He’s been the DJ spinning records pre-show for nearly a decade now. But his story starts much earlier. After his “space rock” band Sabalon Glitz scored a spot on the bill at Lollapalooza in 1995, they became part of the “alternative” bidding war scene in Chicago, and caught the ear of former Atlantic Records Vice President Jon Rubeli. But, a different muse was calling Holmes. He wanted to make music that reflected his love of AM radio. Recording under the name Yum-Yum (an homage to songs like “Sugar Sugar” and bands like 1910 Fruitgum Company), a cassette of bedroom demos moved Rubeli to sign Holmes to a deal on his the new Atlantic imprint TAG Records. The result was 1996’s glorious Dan Loves Patti, a slice of pop perfection, featuring stings, brass, Melllotron and Chamberlin, as well as lush harmonies and hook-laden songs. But as happens in the music industry, a regime change shuttered TAG, and the album was swallowed up into Atlantic. The lack of attention and promotion saw the album fade from view. Omnivore, in conjunction with Holmes, is proud to bring Dan Loves Patti back for its 20th anniversary, this time better than ever. The original album’s newly remastered 12 tracks are enhanced by 10 bonus tracks—4 rare U.K. B-sides (including covers of Prince, The Ronnettes, and even The Muppet Movie classic, “Rainbow Connection”), as well as 6 previously unissued demos. Packaging contains unseen photos, rare ephemera, and an essay from former MTV Executive Vice President Erik Flannigan. To paraphrase Brian Wilson, perhaps Dan Loves Patti just wasn’t made for those times. The time for it is now.

Track Listings

1 I''m Not Telling
2 Apiary
3 Dan Loves Patti
4 Doot-Doot
5 Train of Thought
6 Sister
7 Cross My Heart
8 Ring
9 Jealous of the Stars
10 Uneasy
11 Words Will Fail
12 Lament
13 When You Were Mine
14 Baby, I Love You
15 Rainbow Connection
16 Uneasy (Fuzz Mix)
17 Holding Out For Love (Demo) [Bonus Track]
18 Summertime (Demo) [Bonus Track]
19 I Took Advantage Of The Spring (Demo) [Bonus Track]
20 Automatic Blues (Demo) [Bonus Track]
21 Magic Back In Our Lives (Demo) [Bonus Track]
22 Teaching The Mockingbird To Sing (Demo) [Bonus Track]

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Customer reviews

5 out of 55 out of 5
4 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Dave Beringer
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Ork-pop psych. masterpiece......really.
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2018
What can I say? I’ve owned and loved this record since around the time it first came out. Don’t understand why this is not often praised as the ork-pop psych. masterpiece that it is. I give it 6 stars. I agree with other reviewer that the “demos”(most of them) sound... See more
What can I say? I’ve owned and loved this record since around the time it first came out. Don’t understand why this is not often praised as the ork-pop psych. masterpiece that it is. I give it 6 stars. I agree with other reviewer that the “demos”(most of them) sound like fully realized songs and along with the b-sides would make a fine album itself. I like the remastering....sounds like the bottom end was embellished some.
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Robert J. Hudecek
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
B-sides and Demos are Worth It Alone, Album is Greatness
Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2018
So glad this album was brought back and the b-sides and added tracks (they are called demos on the disc, but sound like fully produced songs) are easily worthy of an album all their own. The original tracks remastered sound great, and you would never know these songs are... See more
So glad this album was brought back and the b-sides and added tracks (they are called demos on the disc, but sound like fully produced songs) are easily worthy of an album all their own. The original tracks remastered sound great, and you would never know these songs are 20 years old.
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hyperbolium
5.0 out of 5 stars
Fetching orchestral-pop eviscerated in a critical crossfire
Reviewed in the United States on April 13, 2019
It’s hard to say which is stranger: the creative genesis of this album or its fiery critical aftermath. In retrospect, the inferno that consumed the album two years after its 1996 release feels more fictional than the actual fiction of the album’s lyrical themes. Originally... See more
It’s hard to say which is stranger: the creative genesis of this album or its fiery critical aftermath. In retrospect, the inferno that consumed the album two years after its 1996 release feels more fictional than the actual fiction of the album’s lyrical themes. Originally conceived as a backstory for names carved into a pair of collectible guitars (a Gibson Hummingbird shown on the front cover, and a Martin D25 shown on the back, for the gearheads out there), the album imagines the histories and emotions of the carver’s failed relationships. But written and arranged by Chris Holmes, the album’s intricate layers of orchestral pop became a post-mortem cause célèbre in an escalating war of indie scene criticism. Was Holmes serious or ironic? Was his album art or merely industrial product? Was it authentic or fake? Thomas Frank’s essay “Pop Music in the Shadow of Irony” brought these questions to bear on the career of his former roommate, and much discussion ensued.

Now, decades removed from the original release and the onslaught of analysis that followed, it’s difficult to imagine how the former begat the latter. For Holmes’ part, he suggests that Frank misconstrued his story of an artist navigating the record industry, selecting elements that fit a handy narrative. Frank described Holmes as having run an ironic play that reversed his label’s mass-market aspirations by doubling down with music that ironically harkened back to the sunshine pop sounds of the 1960s. But decades removed from the Indie vs. Alternative imbroglio of the mid-90s, it’s difficult to hear anything ironic in the album’s beautifully crafted sounds. Perhaps that’s because the made-for-AM-radio pop music from which Holmes took inspiration has turned out to have artistic value and emotional resonance that’s outlasted the taint of its arguably crass production source.

Frank labels Holmes’ claims of “heartfelt and genuine and un-ironic” as fake, and perhaps they were. He describes Holmes’ musical touchstones as “lowbrow” and “schlock,” and derides the idea that this music engenders deep, long-lasting meaning to listeners. But even if Frank is right about the layers of Holmes’ intentions, he’s wrong about the source music’s lasting relevance, and he’s wrong about the outcome of Holmes’ process. Whether or not Holmes was ironic (as were, say, Spinal Tap) or loving (as were, say, the Pooh Sticks), the end result is music to love. And if Holmes was simply faking it, he did a good enough job to render the fraud immaterial. It’s hard to imagine that either Holmes’ label, or Holmes himself, thought this music could successfully fill the market space being vacated by “Alternative,” which leaves Frank’s critique as more fantastic than the story he purports.

If you’re already lost in the multiple levels of revisionism and meta criticism, you may want to skip Brian Doherty’s critique of Frank’s essay, and the additional layers of explanation it reports from Frank and his then-editor at Harper’s. It all sums to an incredible amount of critical ink spilled over a market stiff that somehow managed to become emblematic, to a certain strain of intellectual cognoscenti, of all that is wrong with the fruits of commercial production. It’s hard to recall a pop confection that caused this much critical heartburn since the Monkees complained publicly about their own artistic disenfranchisement. And much like the Monkees, Yum Yum is better taken on its musical merits than the contortions of its creation myth.

Holmes originally developed his industry cred as part of the Chicago space rock band Sabalon Glitz, but when a solo deal materialized with a subsidiary of Atlantic, he decided to pursue the orchestral pop he had bubbling on the sideline. The lessons of Sabalon Glitz aren’t lost here, as the album is layered with vintage mellotron and chamberlin, strings, brass, organ, acoustic and electric guitars, bass and drums. Holmes’ lyrics imagine Dan lamenting his failed relationships, reminiscing about both the joys and stings of love, closing himself off to simmer in bitter thoughts, dream of better outcomes, and imagine cautiously dipping back into the romance pool. It hasn’t the stinging bitterness that informed Matthew Sweet’s Girlfriend , nor the variety of musical motifs, but Holmes’ hushed vocals and lyrics of romantic dissolution are effective, and his melodies are catchy, if not always sufficiently distinct to be instantly memorable.

Omnivore has resuscitated this album the deep sea of critical burial with ten bonus tracks that include a fuzz mix of “Uneasy” that lends the song a Jesus & Mary Chain sound, along with U.K. B-side covers of Prince’s “When You Were Mine,” the Ronettes’ “Baby, I Love You,” and the Muppets’ “Rainbow Connection,” and six previously unreleased demos that had been developed on for a follow-up album that never came to fruition. The gentle reimagining of the iconic hits would have kicked the critical lambasting (which was still engendering bitterness in 2011) into another gear, but add a sweet coda to the original album. The demos offer similar sounds to the album, but with an upturn in the lyrical outlook. “Summertime” has an outro hook worthy of the Archies (that’s a compliment), “I Took Advantage of the Spring” skips along hopefully, and though Holmes eventually re-recorded “Holding Out for Love” with Ashtar Command, the planned follow-up album surrendered to disappointing commercial results and “changes at the record label.”

The original album may be the rediscovered gem, but the demos show even more clearly that if Holmes was putting on a charade, it was an Andy Kaufman-like bid to maintain character. Which would have been a lot of work for no obviously attainable gain. The simpler explanation, the one that most closely fits Occam’s razor, is that Holmes was sincere about this project; that he loved the pop music from which he drew nostalgic inspiration, and that these sources continue to ring with emotional resonance that inspires authentic, long-lasting emotional responses in its fans. That Thomas Frank couldn’t connect with this is more a reflection of Thomas Frank’s musical preferences (or rhetorical needs) than of the music, its fans, or the musicians that it influenced. Omnivore’s reissue includes a booklet featuring previously unpublished photos, and informative liner notes by Erik Flannigan, adding up to the package this album deserved from the start. [©2019 Hyperbolium]
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Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale

Dan outlet online sale 2021 Loves Patti outlet sale